FAQ

Important Documentation

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Documentation & Regulations

To help you decide whether to join us or prepare for your departure, we've compiled the following questions. For complete details on our policies around reservations, cancellations, air arrangements, and more.

  • Q. Do I need a passport to travel to Cuba?

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    Answer:

    Yes—and it must be valid for at least six months following your scheduled departure date to Cuba.

  • Q. Do I need a visa to travel to Cuba?

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    Answer:

    Yes. The cost of a visa for non-Cuban born U.S. citizen and U.S. resident participants is included in your program price. After you reserve, we’ll need you to send us two photocopies of your passport photo page in order to initiate the visa application process.

    Unlike a typical visa that appears in your passport, the Cuban visa is more like a tourist card, which you will receive in Miami prior to your departure for Havana. Upon arrival in Havana, Cuban immigration officials will collect the first half of the card. The other half will be collected when you depart.

  • Q. Should I worry about having a Cuban stamp in my passport?

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    Answer:

    No. The U.S. Government is approving your travel to Cuba under the People to People program/ itinerary provided by Link2Cultures, LLC.

  • Q. How is Link2Cultures able to legally visit Cuba?

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    Answer:

    We are traveling under a “People-to-People” license (CT-2013-304430-1) granted to Link2Cultures,LLC by the U.S. Government Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC).
    Our license provides authorization for “a full-time schedule of educational exchange activities … that will result in meaningful interaction between the travelers and individuals in Cuba”.

  • Q. Can I use U.S. dollars to make purchases in Cuba?

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    Answer:

    No. You’ll need to convert your U.S. dollars into CUCs. In some instances, however, it is appropriate to leave a U.S. dollar as a tip, particularly for restaurant servers or hotel housekeeping staff.

  • Q. What is the exchange rate from U.S. dollars to CUCs?

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    Answer:

    Technically, the CUC is equal to the Euro at a 1:1 ratio. There is about a 10%-12% surcharge for converting U.S. dollars to CUCs, as well as a retail commission. After these charges, you’ll receive around .87 CUC for one dollar.

    The 1.1 exchange rate is subject to change at any time. For the most up-to-date information (not including surcharge and retail commission), we encourage you to visit www.xe.com.

  • Q. Can I use credit or debit cards in Cuba?

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    Answer:

    No, so keep this in mind when you’re preparing for your program. You’ll need to bring enough cash to cover all expenses not included in your program price: Approximately $35-$45 for two dinners not included. You are only allowed to bring home items classified as Art (which includes handcrafts and handmade clothing), Music, or Books.

  • Q. Should I bring traveler’s checks to Cuba?

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    Answer:

    No. We do not recommend using traveler’s checks in Cuba. They will not be insured (which would be the primary reason for bringing them), and they are not widely accepted.

  • Q. How can I obtain CUCs in Cuba?

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    Answer:

    Money can be changed at banks or exchange booths known as Casas de Cambio (CADECA). You’ll find CADECAs in airports and business/shopping districts. They are typically open between 8:30am and 6pm, though some are closed on Sundays and holidays. You can also change money at your hotels.

    Do not exchange currency on the street under any circumstances. Not only is it illegal, but there are scams designed to take advantage of unsuspecting travelers.

  • Q. Can I obtain CUCs before I depart?

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    Answer:

    No, because Cuban currency is not part of the international currency exchange. Similarly, you’ll want to exchange all leftover CUCs before departing Cuba, unless you plan to keep them as souvenirs.

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